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connection update


I posted before about the importance of connection. During this quarantine state we're all in for the moment, I have come to realize even more acutely how vitally important connection is--whether it is a connection to self, community, or the landscape we call home.

Being connected to ourselves means enjoying one's own company. Being connected to home means finding solace in that familiarity, comfort in the place we feel safest. Being connected to community, however, is where we may be struggling most right now.

I've always considered myself an extroverted introvert--I love people but I need my alone time as well. I have realized over the last couple of weeks how much of an extrovert I truly am, how vital my community is to me--my family, my friends, my network, even just strangers with whom I share a smile or hello in the park.

I am so thankful for our technology that enables us to stay connected, if not physically, at least socially. I devour posts from friends, news stories, funny memes, anything to connect and not feel so isolated.

When this is over, let's not forget to connect--smile at every stranger, crouch down to a child's level and look into their eyes and listen when they tell you about the pretty leaf they found, hug a friend, have dinner with your parents and siblings, have a huge party...

stay connected.

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